Summary

The article by Ben Aslinger and Nina B. Huntemann entitled “Digital media studies futures” is the perfect beginning step into the topic of what new media may be in 2060. Without going into great detail, the article discusses many questions which arise when addressing the future of media studies. While media in the past has been seen as a particular technology or medium (film or radio for example), media is now evolving into more of an experience, rather than a medium. Because the technologies and methodologies in regards to media are developing rapidly, it would be irrelevant to define any new media as a single medium. One of the greatest debates for the futures of media studies is it’s relation to academia. In the past, scholars would approach topics with solely a theoretical approach, using case studies. However, because media studies is forever changing, this practice must be changed in order to create a beneficial future for media studies. The highlights how scholars would learn a specific media, however it would then become obsolete before they complete their studies. In addition, scholars were also taught to direct their focus on a few topics rather than a variety. This style of learning needs to change in order to accommodate the vast expansion of media studies. Studying a single discipline is not acceptable anymore, scholars need to become interdisciplinary thinkers. In short, the old ways of learning simply won’t cut it when it comes to media studies. The collaboration of multifaceted thinkers are now in high demand.

 

Source:

Aslinger, Ben, and Nina B. Huntemann. “Digital Media Studies Futures.” Media, Culture & Society 35.1 (2013): 9-12. Sage Publications. Web. 15 Oct. 2013.

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Exercise 5: Summary

My summary:

The article “Working the Twittersphere” outlines the application of Twitter in it’s place of the social media realm. More specifically, how Twitter relates to professional and personal online  identity. The popularity of this social network allows many perks to arise. Such as professionals using this micro-blogging platform to network themselves with other social media users. With the help of the semantic property of the internet, using Twitter allows the gathering of information to then be analyzed in order to determine Twitter’s place in the online world. Twitter is unique among the social networks because any user can interact with another. The more Twitter is being used, more information and resources can be shared amongst users. However, the majority of “Tweets” shared in an isolated study suggests that users simply interact with one another rather than an attempt to network with others. The use of social media is difficult to place when discussing topics such as online identity. The article addresses the situation where the line between professional and personal identity is blurred.

Jodie Quach’s Comment:

The summary is short and straight to the point covering the main points of Dawn R. Gilpin’s article. Because this is a summary of the article, specific examples, facts and case studies were not included.

Rewrite:

The article “Working the Twittersphere” by Dawn R. Gilpin outlines the application of Twitter in it’s place of the social media realm. More specifically, how Twitter relates to the controversy behind professional and personal online identities. The popularity of this social network allows many perks and shortcomings to arise. Such as professionals using this micro-blogging platform to network themselves with other social media users. With the help of the semantic property of the internet, using Twitter allows the gathering of information to then be analyzed in order to determine Twitter’s influence in the online world. Twitter is unique among the social networks because any user can interact with another. The more Twitter is being used, the more information and resources which can be shared amongst users. The use of social media is difficult to place when discussing topics such as online identity. The article addresses the situation where the line between professional and personal identity is blurred.

 

Source:

Gilpin, Dawn R. (2011). Working the Twittersphere: Microblogging as a Professional identity Construction in Papacharissi, Zizi (2011).  A Networked Self. Identity, Community, and Culture on Social Network Sites.